Whenever you get yourself off the couch and start training it can be a difficult experience. We’ve all been there, whether you’ve never really done activity ever or you are an athlete who took a few months off. Maybe you are just getting back into it after overcoming an injury. Whatever the case may be there is going to be some soreness as you begin training your body and muscles to be active.

It’s important to be able to identify the difference between the good hurt and the bad hurt. Good hurt means you’ve pushed yourself just enough to begin the muscle building process, bad hurt means you’ve overdone it and are at risk of injury or possibly, already injured. Knowing the difference between the two kinds of hurt can make all the difference in your training program.

Good Hurt

The good kind of hurt is that achy soreness you feel after a good workout. Perhaps you just had an awesome leg day. The next day you wake up feeling weaker than you were the day before. This is usually the good kind of hurt. It means, “Hell ya, I just killed that WOD and now I’m going to hobble up these stairs today.” If the soreness ever lasts more than two days, you know you went too hard and that’s when you have to worry.

Good hurt can come in many forms but usually it’s just muscle soreness or stiffness. I have great news for you, there is a way to overcome the good hurt and it all comes down to stretching, foam rolling, and even massage. Yes, the massage, one of the best recovery systems there is, self-massage or professional massage. No matter which you choose both can help aid in recovery from this “good hurt” you are experiencing. Foam rolling is a very effective way to massage your muscles yourself. Always take a proactive role in drinking lots of water. This helps to flush all the lactic acid out and keeps your muscles hydrated. Remember the adult body is made up of 50-65% water.

When your muscles are sore from a workout it’s because you have torn the little fibers, when these fibers rebuild you develop scar tissue which forms a stronger bond building a bigger muscle. That’s the most unscientific way to put it. When the muscles are growing you need to constantly stretch them and help them to recover, if you don’t you’ll become even stiffer and lose flexibility. You should stretch before and after your workouts, as dynamic stretching has been touted as being safer than static stretching, but both serve their purposes.

Bad Hurt

One thing you want to avoid more than anything is the “bad hurt.” This is the kind of hurt that doesn’t go away after a day or two. This is the pain that lingers; it could be a tear in your muscles, tendons, or a broken bone. You’ll know when you’ve gone too far because the pain will be excruciating. If the pain only kind-of sucks and fades, it’s probably the aforementioned, “good hurt,” if the pain is sharp and doesn’t dissipate in a short manner of time, it’s most likely a “bad hurt.”

Unless you can tell immediately that something is seriously broken or torn, you’ll want to give it a day or two before going in to see a doctor. Remember doctors have a lot on their plate and deal with hundreds of patients. You don’t want to be the person that goes in, wastes their time, your money, just to find out your have a little muscle soreness. Some good ways to identify if what you are experiencing is “bad hurt” are to stop and take a breath. Can you still move around without shooting, sharp, targeted pain? If the pain is very centralized it could be the “bad hurt.”

The “bad hurt” is something you’ll usually feel more immediately, it’ll be distinct and something you don’t want to push through. The “good hurt” usually comes the day following your workout. All pain is different and sometimes it can be hard to diagnose so of course when in doubt go see a doctor but give it a day or two, if you can bare it, and make sure it’s not just something minor that will go away with some proper rest, stretching, foam rolling, massage, or some good ol’ ice.

Take good care of yourself before and after your workouts and hopefully you’ll never have to experience the “bad hurt.” Be smart, stretch often, foam roll, drink lots of water and Spartan on!

We’ll see you at the finish line…

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When one talks to friends and family about training, one activity often gets unfairly overlooked. Despite being arguably one of the better ways to get in shape, and more importantly stay that way, it remains bizarrely underrated. The activity we are talking about is swimming.

The benefits of swimming are numerous and what’s more, it’s a skill that ideally everyone should have. Swimming can literally save your life. So why doesn’t swimming play an active role in your training? It should, and here’s some reasons why:

1) Low Impact

As part of being active and training, running will invariably be part of your way of life. The wear on your joints while running however, can take their toll. This isn’t an issue when it comes to swimming. There is no ground impact when you swim. In fact the Arthritis Foundation are very keen to push this fact. So much so that you may even find sponsored classes all over the country. Water or Aqua aerobics are increasingly popular for this very reason, as the natural buoyancy in the water means that this is an change to your routine you should explore if you haven’t already done so. When the human body is immersed in water it automatically becomes lighter. When immersed to the waist, your body bears just 50 percent of its weight; dunk yourself to the chest and that number reduces to around 25 to 35 percent; with water all the way to the neck, you only have to bear 10 percent of your own weight. The remaining 90 percent is handled by the pool.
Even better news is that if you have access to a pool that is heated, rheumatoid arthritis sufferers will notice the difference in how stiff joints are “loosened”.

2) Cardiorespiratory fitness

Regular swimming builds endurance. In fact, one study amongst sedentary middle aged men and women who swam as training for only 3 months found that maximal oxygen consumption levels improved by around 10% and stroke volume (the amount of blood pumped with each beat which indicates heart strength) improved as much as 18%.

3) Life long activity

The idea that swimming can only be done up to a certain age is utter nonsense. Because of the lack of impact, swimming is an activity that can be done through ones entire life. The US Masters Swimming website even has a category for those aged between 100 and 104.
Never forget that one of the heroes of Spartan Race is also one of the biggest ambassadors for swimming as part of an active life  – Jack La Lanne. Jack still swam for an hour a day before he passed away aged 93.

4) Muscle mass improvement

In a study that lasted 2 months, men who completed the swimming program showed, on average, 23.8% increase in the tricep muscle. The resistance of the water when moving, whether it’s submerged running, has consistently proved itself to be an excellent way to build and tone. Because water is 12 times denser than air, and it’s been proven that resistance work aids muscles development and toning, getting in the water should be a no-brainer.

5) An aid for the injured

When sportsmen and women become injured, especially in the lower extremities, swimming or submerged training is a given. The resistance not only allows them to keep training due to the lack of impact, but it serves as an excellent rehabilitation tool.

NFL star Chad Jones in water rehabilitation after injury.

 

6) Family fun

As discussed in a previous Spartan blog, with childhood obesity levels not showing signs of slowing, swimming and playing in water is something any family can do that is a perfect example of making exercise or training fun.

7) Burn those calories!

Swimming burns lots of calories, anywhere from 500-650 per hour depending on how efficiently you swim. The good news is that as a beginner, or someone who hasn’t yet mastered a long, clean stroke, thrashing and flopping through an untidy stroke will actually burn more calories. So, if you wanted to use the excuse that you can’t swim – now’s your chance!
While swimming burns a little less than running and only slightly less than biking, it is still an excellent resource for toning and slimming. Naturally, this is dependent upon the intensity of how hard you swim. Faster strokes for longer will burn more calories, but that’s also where the endurance comes in.

8) Flexibility

We’re often told that, as a Spartan racer, there’s difference between movement and flexibility. Some of the shapes we make with our bodies during races aren’t what you’d call “normal”. Climbing over that slippery wall often has folk with one leg thrown over the side while the hands still grip the rope and the other foot is planted on the side. All very contorted and unusual. How about some of the positions some folks get in when they go over the suspended cargo net? Or the Over-Under-Through obstacle? These all require flexibility and swimming is the perfect tool for that.
While doing the crawl stroke, think about it. Your arms are making arcs, one after the other, pushing the water away from you. You’ll be turning your hips from side to side while you do this motion in order for your arms to gain a better positions. While all this is going on, your legs are kicking in a scissor motion.

Your whole body is moving and contorting in different directions. With regular swimming and different swimming techniques and strokes, your body becomes more and more flexible.

9) Help your heart!

Because swimming is an aerobic exercise, it serves to strengthen the heart, not only helping it to become larger, but making it more efficient in pumping — which leads to better blood flow throughout your body. Research also shows that aerobic exercise can combat the body’s inflammatory response as well — a key link in the chain that can lead to heart disease.
If that’s not enough to get you moving in the pool, the American Heart Association reports that just 30 minutes of exercise per day, such as swimming, can reduce coronary heart disease in women by 30 to 40 percent. Additionally, an analysis by the Annals of Internal Medicine showed that regular aerobic exercise could reduce blood pressure.

So the question really isn’t about why you should go swimming. It’s really why you shouldn’t. If you cannot swim, there are almost certainly lessons available close to you. Not only will it keep you healthy, toned, improve your respiratory system, joints, muscles and flexibility, it may even save your life.

Swim to win.

See you at the finish line…

Credits: usaswimming.org, active.com, nj.com, bodybuilding.com

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