by Carrie Adams

To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all.” -Oscar Wilde

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Ray Morvan

Recently, Spartan Race has been covering profiles of the awe-inspiring individuals taking part in the Spartan Death Race.  An endurance event like no other on the planet that has been taking place every year in Pittsfield since 2005.  It’s an event aimed at giving competitors the ultimate challenge in the Green Mountains of Vermont and an opportunity for those brave enough to sign up the chance to find themselves and redefine their lives in a backdrop of unforeseeable challenges.  It’s a once-in-a-lifetime chance to show that overcoming is worth the effort required to achieve it and being alive is a state of being where death is just a state of mind.

Ax in hand, Ray Morvan, now 48, hacked away at the stump in the ground for over an hour, using his hands at various points to dig and pry at the roots of the stubborn stump to extract it from the ground.  He’d removed his bib already that was previously pinned to it and now he worked at the stubborn, heavy stump expertly with his ax.  His reward for the task – to carry the heavy piece of wood for the rest of the day.  He would DNF that race at the 11 hour mark – his first attempt at the race in the summer of 2009.

In the winter race the following year, he was told to put together a wheel barrow and then cart 12 logs of firewood up the mountain in deep snow.  With no easy way to push the wheelbarrow in the drifts of snow, he had to improvise in order to navigate the trail with  the heavy logs and cumbersome wheelbarrow to reach the summit.  It was a daunting task.

This summer marks the fifth race for the veteran Death Racer, a mortgage banker from Springfield, VT.  His first attempt, he weighed in at just about 240 pounds and had recently left rehab for treatment of a drug and alcohol addiction.  He was admittedly not ready and when he left at the 11 hour mark, a spark had been ignited.  For a man who nearly died in 2002  from appendicitis and has endured more than a dozen abdominal surgeries since, he’s no stranger to death and he plans on competing in the race until they won’t let him anymore.

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By Carrie Adams

Rebecca Hansen

Rebecca Hansen isn’t your average 49-year-old mother of three daughters. Unless racing Double Ironman Events, Death Races, and 100+ mile ultras are average. The marketing strategist and fitness trainer from Naples, Florida is charging forward with her life, living it to the fullest and making her own rules as she goes.

“I hate it when people say you can’t do it,” she says when talking about training for so many varied endurance events. “Yes, I am simultaneously training for a Double Ironman, Ironman, the Death Race, and my standard 100 milers. They are all very different races but they are all my races.”

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by Carrie Adams

“Give a girl the right shoes, and she can conquer the world.”  – Marilyn Monroe

Cassandra Randolph, Arizona

We’re pretty sure Marilyn was talking about muddy running shoes.  Our Spartan female champions and participants are showing up, taking on the Spartan Races, and showing the men how to make dirt look good.  Recently, we discussed the topic of getting chicked, a term that refers to a man getting passed on the course by a woman.  The post had our men shaking in their Nikes and our women standing up and cheering.

Our Competitive Wave One Women winners each brought a physical and mental toughness to the race.  Their victories have been great achievements and highlight what’s possible for women in the Spartan racing circuit.  Undoubtedly there was epic “chicking” involved.

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